Amy Duggar Just Can't Catch A Break!

Everything was going very well for Amy Duggar until around 2015, when the news broke that her cousin Josh had molested five underage girls. The scandal created a fissure within the ultra-conservative Christian family, with Amy, the more liberal Duggar, encouraged to pick a side. To that point, Amy had played lead in two spinoff episodes of her family's hit TLC reality show, 19 and Counting. Her star was rising in Nashville as a young country music singer, and she'd already begun dating her now husband, Dillon King—even though their pre-marital canoodling violated the strict Duggar family courtship rules (side-hugs only). Amy and Dillon are now cast members of WE tv's reality show Marriage Boot Camp, dropping a bombshell before the first episode even aired. Take a look at Amy Duggar's very public highs and lows.

 

1. Going to Nashville

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1. Going to Nashville

Amy Duggar King is known as the black sheep of her fundamentalist Christian family, the Duggars, made famous on the now-canceled TLC reality show 19 and Counting, which ran from 2008 to 2015. Amy's mother is the sister of Duggar patriarch Jim Bob, the father 19 of Amy's cousins. She appeared on several episodes of the show, and spun off for two specials including one titled "A Duggar Leaves Home" in which the young Lafayette, Arkansas, native left The Natural State for Nashville, Tennessee to pursue a career as a country music singer. On "A Duggar Leaves Home," Amy meets with famed music producer Jamie Slocum, who tells her that her singing is "horrifically awful." In the episode, Amy performs a live gig, which ends up being a disaster. Unfazed and hell-bent on following her dream, Amy Duggar released an album titled Amy Jordyn in 2006.

 

2. Amy won't pay up

2. Amy won't pay up

After "A Duggar Leaves Home" aired, in June 2014, the music producer Jamie Slocum, who helped Amy realize her goal of becoming a country music star, spoke out against his student, who he believes to be cheap. Duggar's manager (whom she fired) on 19 and Counting, helped the reality star negotiate a much bigger contract for her two spinoff specials, including "A Duggar Leaves Home." After discovering that Amy was receiving significantly more money per episode of the new show, Slocum—who wrote songs for Amy to sing and is credited as an associate producer on the episodes—wanted to be paid commiserate with Amy's new contract. In an interview with Radar Online, Slocum said, "Now that there is bigger money coming down the line they just want me to go away. They don't want to pay me because they are very cheap. They thought I was just trying to be nice … They basically decided to tell me to take a hike after I doubled their fee." Understandably upset and feeling slighted, Slocum said that he was considering taking the Duggars to court. "They could get their butt sued off for doing what they are doing," he told Radar Online.

 

3. The bad influence

Two years after her Nashville specials aired, Amy responded to a question on her Instagram, implying that her Duggar relatives consider her to be a bad influence on their straight-laced, conservative children. When one of her fans asked if Amy's cousin ever come over to her house to watch TV and stay the night, Amy responded by saying, "Hey there! we've had a girls night before and have gone out to eat. It's a rule though that if I want to spend quality time with them I have to come see them. They don't want me to influence them."

3. The bad influence

And while Amy may have strayed from the Arkansas homestead to pursue a career in music, she still holds many of the same Christian values as her extended family. On Instagram, Amy wrote, "It used to really bother me and then I realized that I just live knowing that God gives us grace. I can only be myself and even though we don't see eye to eye on every little thing we are still family and I do still love them. ." Those same values were challenged publicly when—after a 2006 police report—Amy's cousin Josh was accused of molesting five underage girls in 2002, four of whom were his sisters.

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